Monday, August 3, 2015

Israel

Late last year my dad came to me to discuss going on vacation.  My parents were about to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary in 2015 and he wanted to take my mom on a trip to commemorate this milestone.  Before I even got a chance to think about it, he proposed going to either Israel or Hawaii.  Most people think that these are two totally random, extremely different places.  I can't agree more; however, my mom has talked about how she has wanted to go to both, so they seemed like appropriate options.  My dad then asked me what I thought and if I had any other ideas.  Quite honestly, I couldn't have come up with anything much better.  Considering my mom's lack of desire to travel terribly far, I suggested Israel because I felt like it was just a little closer and I knew they could get a direct flight from Philadelphia to Tel Aviv.  My dad was also fully aware that he would struggle to plan this trip on his own.  He also knew that I would enjoy planning it and that I would do a stellar job.  In addition, he was unable to deny the fact that if I was planning the trip, I would definitely want to come with.  And if he was taking me, he should also invite my brother as well.  That's how this slightly off-the-beaten-track vacation began.

First, a little bit about Israel...For those who are unaware, Israel is a small country about the size of New Jersey located among some of the world's most volatile countries in the Middle East.  It is also one of the most resilient and astounding countries I have even seen.  It never ceases to amaze me how not only was this country completely unphased by all the unrest around it, but it was also able to thrive economically leap-frogging in a way in which it's economy will soon enough converge with the world's more advanced countries.  I had never seen anything like it.  If you would like to learn more about Israel's incredible advancement, I would highly suggest reading Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel's Economic Miracle by Dan Senor and Saul Singer.  This book not only helped explain how Israel's economy grew, but also gave some great incite into the mindset of the Israeli people, their way of life, and how they view the world.  I read this before I went, and so many things made much more sense to me than they would have otherwise.

As for my trip, we started in Tel Aviv where we spent our first night.  Then we took a three day tour which took us up to the northern part of the country.  While there we approached both the Lebanese and Syrian borders, briefly saw the towns of Tiberias and Hafia, watched the sunrise over the Sea of Galilee, and learned endless amounts about Israel's tumultuous history.

Hafia

Acco (Near the Lebanese Border)

The Lebanese Border
(You're not allowed to take pictures of the actual border crossing)

The Syrian Border



The Sea of Galilee

The Ancient City of Beit Shean


After this first tour, we were left off in Jerusalem.  For this part of the trip I decided to go a bit more ad hoc.  We spent the majority of our time in Jerusalem without a tour guide, leading ourselves around this incredible ancient city.  Jerusalem, East Jerusalem in particular, amazed me due to its melding of religions.  At one point we found ourselves on the narrow streets of the old city listening to the Franciscan monks recite the stations of the cross, while simultaneously hearing the Islamic call to prayer in the near distance, all the while being in a country that is 75 percent Jewish.  You always hear about all this fighting that occurs in this part of the world, but we rarely ever saw it.

The Western Wall with the Dome of the Rock in the Background

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre


The Church of Pater Noster
(The "Our Father" in different languages)

The View of the Old City from the Mount of Olives


One day while we were in Jerusalem, we took a day trip to the Dead Sea and Masada.  Masada is an ancient fortress that was built on a plateau above the Dead Sea by Herod the Great roughly two thousand years ago.  It's amazing how something like that can still be there today.  And as many people may know, you go to the Dead Sea for one reason only...to float.  The water is so salty that you immediately bounce back to the surface.  However you also come out covered in this salty slime that is truly disgusting.

Masada

The View of the Dead Sea from Masada


After spending five nights in Jerusalem, it was time to depart for our next adventure.  We took another three day tour to southern Israel and Jordan.  We drove all the way south to Eilat on the Red Sea.  Then we spent the second day of the tour crossing the border into Jordan to go to Petra.  Petra was where I truly found my physical limits.  We walked two and a half miles downhill through terrain that was often rocky or sandy.  Then, although some people opted to pay for a ride back up (**Cough Cough** Mom and Dad), me and my brother decided to walk all the way back up to the entrance.  None of this would have been that bad had we not been on a rather strict time frame and had it not been 95 degrees outside.  Nonetheless, I think Petra may have been my favorite part of the whole trip.  And finally on the third day of this tour we traveled back up to Tel Aviv through the Negev Desert making a few stops including one at the desert home of David Ben Gurion, the first prime minister of Israel.  I do believe it was his unique vision that has led Israel to be what it is today.

The Coral Reef in the Red Sea

The Treasury at Petra



Statue of Ben Gurion


Once back in Tel Aviv, we spent one last day lounging by the beach and taking in the sun, the sand, and the sea, before departing to come back to the states.

Overall, I think it was a fantastic trip!  There was only one bombing while we were there and it was in Gaza (a place most tourists would never go).  The Israeli people are not only astounding in their own right, but they are some of the most grateful and gracious people I've ever met.  Everywhere we went our tour guides were constantly thanking us for choosing to visit Israel, which, compared to many other destinations, is quite expensive and often not considered the safest place to go.  That being said, whether you are Catholic or Jewish, religious or not so religious, Israel is such an incredible country to go see and experience in all its glory!