Saturday, January 23, 2016

Entitlement

I recently came across a statistic that said that 38% of Americans have a valid passport.  38%.  When I heard this I started bringing it up in conversation with various people in my life.  Some of them thought that it sounded somewhat high and were surprised that it was so many.  Others thought it was low and should've been more.  I lean toward the latter.  I think it's kind of sad that not more Americans want to travel internationally.  Obviously 38% is not the percentage of Americans who have ever left the U.S., because many people may have had a passport in the past, but do not have a valid one at the moment.  I don't blame them if they have no further intent to travel abroad.  At least they have in the past.  For me, I like to always have a valid passport.  I never know when I may want to take a spontaneous trip.

Upon further thinking on this topic, I realized that probably only about half of all Americans have ever left the country.  That means that the other half have never been outside the U.S. to experience what else this world has to offer and many of these people never will.  In light of the upcoming presidential election, I don't think this is very fair.  These people who have never left the country get to vote for those who ultimately decide the fate of this planet.  Many people, even if they have traveled abroad, are often uninformed or misinformed.  There are so many Americans that just don't understand what happens in this world and why it should matter to them.

When I was living in Uganda, one day in the staff room at school Obama came on the TV.  I honestly don't even remember what he was talking about that day but it was the only part of that news broadcast where the entire room fell silent.  President Museveni, Uganda's president, could have come on the news and no one would have cared, but when Obama talks people around the world listen.  After that news segment was over, one of the other teachers looked at me and said "Our president.  Obama decides so much of what happens in this world, so he is not just your president, but our president too."  He wasn't saying this is a bitter way at all.  He was very proud.  Most Ugandans love Obama.  But it really struck me that that is how he felt.  He realized that Obama's impact is felt worldwide.

This all leads me to ask: Why do we as Americans get to vote for those who decide the fate of the world and others don't?  What makes us so special?

Honestly the answer is that we were privileged enough to be born here.  We hit the genetic lottery.  So when Americans act entitled because of their status as U.S. citizens, they need to be reminded that they didn't do anything special to get here.  They just happened to be lucky.  Maybe someday all will be fair in the world with some greater form of global governance.  As for now, appreciate your rights as citizens of the most powerful country in the world.  None of us should take that lightly.





Note: I should add the caveat that most people I know and associate with on a regular basis have valid U.S. passports and/or have traveled abroad.  Because of this my perception may be a little skewed or bias, so take this post as you will.

No comments:

Post a Comment